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Fundamental Human Rights Enforcement Under the Nigerian Law

Human rights are rights which are recognized legally as Fundamental Rights as distinguished from mere aspirations or individual ideas of rights. These fundamental rights are now embodied in Chapter IV of the Nigeria constitution 1999 as amended from Section 33 and 45 and the African charter on Human and People Right. The charter became part of Nigeria law by virtue of the /African Charter on Human and People Right (Application and Enforcement) Laws of the federation 2004.

The rights provided by the constitution are as follows: Right to life, section 33; right to dignity of human person, section 34; right to personal liberty, section 35; right to fair hearing, section 36; right to private and family life, section 37; right to freedom of thought, conscience and religion, section 38; right to freedom of expression and the press, section 39; right to peaceful assembly and association, section 40; right to freedom of movement, section 41; right to freedom from discrimination, section 42; right to acquire and own immovable property anywhere in Nigeria, section 43 amongst others.

These guaranteed rights are justifiable in the court of law in Nigeria. In order to actualize the protection and enforcement of these rights, section 46: subsection 3 of the constitution empowers the Chief Justice of Nigeria to make rules with respect to practice and procedure of a High Court for the purposes of enforcing the fundamental rights of a person contravened, being or likely to be contravened in any state in Nigeria. In exercise of these powers, the former Chief Justice of Nigeria, Idris Legbo Kutigi, made the Fundamental Right (Enforcement Procedure) Rules 2009, which became effective from December 1, 2009.

With the coming into force of the 2009 Rules, the Fundamental Right (Enforcement Procedure) Rules 1979 made by the then Chief Justice Fatayi Williams CJN which have been in force since January 1, 1980 were effectively abrogated subject however to savings provisions in respect of fundamental rights proceedings commenced thereunder and pending at the commencement of the new rules.

WHO CAN APPLY FOR ENFORCEMENT OF FUNDAMENTAL RIGHTS?

Under the 1999 constitution as amended, the persons who can apply to a High Court for the enforcement of fundamental rights are spelt out under section 46 (1) as: Any person who alleges that any of the provisions of this chapter (IV) has been, is being, or likely to be contravened in any state in relation to him may apply to a High Court in that state for redress.

REMEDIES FOR FUNDAMENTAL RIGHT ENFORCEMENT
1. Damages to the applicant
2. Court injunction to restrain the respondent’s action
3. Compensation to the applicant

CONCLUSION
We have observed that the foundation of any genuine democracy is embedded in the rule of law, a principal that demands devotion to the moral and human values, the common heritage of the people and true source of individual freedom and liberty. This is one of the legacies that our colonial masters, the British left for us, a libertarian tradition of the common law and its system of justice embodied in the Magna Carta Act of 1215 and the Bill of Right Act of 1689. Civil liberty that were guaranteed by the colonial government were expressed in the various constitutional conference held in the march towards Nigeria’s independence in order to allay minority tribe fear of domination by majority tribe. Fundamental human rights have since then continued to feature very prominently in the successive constitutions of the federal republic of Nigeria.

 

 

About the Writer: Evans Ufeli is a lawyer and the author of acclaimed novel, ‘Without Face’. He is also an Alumni member of the Writers Bureau, Manchester, a highly sought-after conference speaker with a passion for the concept of change. He lives in Victoria Island, Lagos. You can contact him via Facebook: Evans Ufeli, Email: evanylaw@yahoo.com, Twitter: @Evansufeli and Phone: 08037712353. He blogs atwww.ethicsafrica4u.wordpress.com.

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Evans Ufeli Esq

Evans Ufeli is a lawyer and the author of acclaimed novel, ‘Without Face’. He is also an Alumni member of the Writers Bureau, Manchester, a highly sought-after conference speaker with a passion for the concept of change. He lives in Victoria Island, Lagos. You can visit his blog or contact him via Facebook or Twitter by clicking the icons below; send an email to evanylaw@yahoo.com or call 08037712353

1 Comment

1 Comment

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    Cole Ehigiator

    9th February 2016 at 11:16 am

    Drawing a context on Human Right Enforcement in Nigeria. I would like to know more about the Socio Legal Issues.

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